News
Beauty in flowers

Here is just one example of the many beautification projects that the City of Bay St. Louis' Beautification Department has been involved with. Below is an article from the Sun Herald.

 

After reading the below article from the Sun Herald, if you would like learn more about America Responds With Love and activities taking place not only here in Bay St. Louis, but throughout the state of Mississippi, you can click on this Press Release link for more details.

 

Organization to supply flowers on Coast

 


Read more here: http://www.sunherald.com/2013/07/15/4798178/organization-to-supply-flowers.html#storylink=cpy

In a few weeks, lilies, berries, elephant ears and other flowers will be in full bloom in a few towns across the Gulf Coast with the help of a national non-profit organization, America Responds With Love.

 

The organization, based in Valley Forge, Pa., specializes in helping communities across the nation, particularly those that have been devastated by a natural disaster. The bulbs will be planted in communities throughout Harrison and Hancock counties.

 

"It's important for people to look forward," said Richard McDonough, president of America Responds With Love, Inc. "Within about six weeks, you can change the landscape, it's about helping people enhance their communities."


McDonough said his organization has been sponsoring projects in Mississippi for several years.

 

"You wouldn't know it, but many of the flowers growing in Bay St. Louis at different times have been from us," he said. "It makes the area more attractive. It won't solve everything, but it gives people an opportunity to be productive."


McDonough said depending on the community, garden clubs, volunteers or city employees plant the bulbs.

 

"It goes beyond simply having the area look pretty, in some places this is specifically done for people to go out and get exercise," McDonough said. "It's even good from an educational standpoint, it teaches people how things grow."

 

The coastal communities are part of a statewide initiative, which includes more than 1 million flower bulbs being planted in 21 towns and cities across Mississippi. McDonough said Petal, a town near Hattiesburg that sustained severe damage during a EF-4 tornado in February, is one storm-ravaged area that will receive flowers.

 

"Our view is to help those who have fallen down get back up," McDonough said.

 

Communities were chosen to participate based on applications or recommendations.

 

The Mississippi Municipal League, Keep Mississippi Beautiful, the Mississippi Beverage Association and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are also working with America Responds With Love on the project.

 

 

 
“Day of Beauty, Day of Service”

You are invited to participate in a wonderful day of bulb beautification in Bay St. Louis!


AmeriCorps NCCC is hosting a “Day of Beauty, Day of Service” in Bay St. Louis from 9am until 3pm on Saturday, May 11th. Volunteers are needed and they will be planting Daffodil and Iris bulbs donated by the “America Responds With Love Gardens”, a non-profit organization that has given over 5 million flowers to towns across America . AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps does independent service projects while they work in assigned communities nation-wide.


Bring shovels and gloves....planting will occur along the roadway sides on public grounds.


Location: Seal Point, Bay Saint Louis, MS


Directions: From Highway 90 turn left at first stop light onto Dunbar Ave./ St. Francis. You will go through 2 stop signs ( pass by Texaco gas station) and go about ¾ of a miles, on your right you will see land that has been cleared, turn right into the Seal Point area.

 
Happy Garden in McDonald Park

 

Work was recently completed at McDonald Park in Bay St. Louis for the “Happy Garden” dedicated to the late Happy Gaines. Donations by friends and relatives helped to create the memorial. The garden was designed by Liz Younghouse Seal and Katharine Truett Ohman to eventually be a well-shaded play spot for younger children along with a comfortable seating area for parents and others.

Twenty 15-gallon Crape Myrtles were planted in an inner and outer circle arrangement with ten trees to each. These included rotating Biloxi (pink) and Tuscarora (watermelon red) all planted by the Bay St. Louis Beautification Department under the direction of Jimmy Loiacano. With proper care and trimming, the trees will eventually create an interlocking circular canopy for children to enjoy especially during the warmer months. A centrally located black iron serpentine bench and a matching “Natchez” ornamental rubbish receptacle were also purchased from the donations.

A plaque on the bench is inscribed: “Happy” Garden - “Creative play is like a spring that bubbles up from deep within a child.” - Joan Almon. Another on the receptacle reads:

Katharine Ohman said, “The bench was purchased from Mississippi Prison Industries (MPI) with transporting it left to the City. But after learning about some problems that would have delayed us, MPI delivered it free of charge for which we are extremely grateful. Similarly, after ordering the plaques from M&MM’s Trophy, the owner furnished them as a donation. Most importantly we need to thank those friends of Happy Gaines who made possible a fitting tribute along with an area local kids will enjoy for generations to come.”

Mayor Les Fillingame and Helen Gaines (center) with others at the dedication of the 'Happy Garden' (photo by Jimmy Loiacano)

 

 
Harbor Construction Begins

If you've driven down Beach Boulevard lately you may have noticed that the construction at the Bay St. Louis Municipal Harbor and Pier has begun.  The first phase of construction began on November 5, 2012 with the dredging of more than 150,000 cubic yards of sand to make way for the harbor basin.  The sand is being used to add to the existing sand beach between the Bay Bridge and Demontluzin Avenue.  The dredged sand is also being used as backfill material for raising the harbor parking lot to 10ft above mean sea level.

 

The harbor will be located between Demontluzin Avenue and the CSX Railroad bridge.  Shortly after the new year, a Harbor Commission will be put into place to begin the necessary tasks, such as setting fees for slip rental, searching for a harbor master, and taking applications for rental spaces.

 

Jason Chiniche, Project Engineer with Brown and Mitchell of Gulfport, is overseeing the construction of the harbor.  Jason has set up a blog with photos and will be giving updates showing the progress of the project as construction continues.  You can follow the progress by clicking the link here, or by going to www.bslharbor.blogspot.com.

 

 

 

 
BAY ADOPTS IRIS

The Bay St. Louis City Council at its May 8th meeting voted unanimously to adopt the Iris (Hexagonae) as the City’s official flower.  The idea was originally proposed by Katharine Truett Ohman, sponsored by Ward Two Council Member Wendy McDonald and supported by the Master Gardeners, Bay-Waveland Garden Club, BSL Beautification Division and Mayor Les Fillingame. Some of the aspects of this particular plant, both practical and subjective, presented to the Council were:

A native plant that is naturally occurring in marshy locations of coastal Mississippi.

Displays hardiness and adaptability to flourish in a variety of soils.  Performs best under full sun to partial shade in

moist, acidic soils (predominant type in our area).

The ability to absorb non-point source pollutants and enhance ground water quality.  Bay St. Louis at present has three “Conservational Landscape” areas established by the City’s Beautification Department and planted exclusively with specimens donated from private gardens in or near BSL.

A popular ornamental, in early Spring it produces flowers in a wide range of vivid colors and this selection makes it adaptable to compliment any landscape.

This variety of Iris has sword-like foliage and grows on average between 3 and 6 feet high but is very manageable, a low maintenance plant.  Handles transplanting exceptionally well without critical timing or procedure.

Its ability to survive and thrive in varied environments can be compared to the strength, resiliency and resourcefulness of the citizens of “The Bay,” particularly in the aftermath of major disasters (Camille, Katrina, etc.).  It can be cut down to ground level, as hurricanes have done to the City, but will quickly start new growth and return to its original or better condition.

First named by 19th Century naturalist and artist John James Audubon. The five species of this iris are collectively known as Hexagonae and consist of  Iris hexagona, Iris fulva, Iris brevicaulis, Iris giganticaerulea and Iris nelsonii.

 

 

 

 
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